Primate Care Sheets - Capuchins

Capuchins (Cebus) are called ring-tail monkeys for their habit of curling the tip of their tail.  They’re very social animals and one of the most intelligent primates kept in captivity which is why they’re often used in movies.  They are know to use a strong smelling substance (such as onions, orange peels or stale) to rub all over their body.   Here you’ll find more information about keeping capuchins as pets.

Brown Pale-fronted Capuchin
Brown pale-fronted capuchin
(Cebus Albifrons)
(c) Ivan Crab
White Faced Capuchin
White Faced Capuchin
(Cebus Capucinus)
(c) Philip Greenspun
Black-capped capuchin
Black-capped Capuchin
(Cebus Appella)
(c) Ivan Crab

 

Capuchin Care Sheets

General Information

Housing

Diet

Reproduction

Pictures

Videos

Capuchin Species:

Black-capped, brown or tufted capuchin (Cebus apella)
Brown pale-fronted capuchin (Cebus albifrons)
Robust tufted capuchin (Cebus apella robustus)
Weeping capuchin (Cebus nigrivittatus)
White-faced or white-throated capuchin (Cebus capucinus)
Yellow breasted capuchin (Cebus apella xanthrosternus)

Get a rehome … they said

July 14, 2017 5:41 pm

dora cinnamon capuchin

I can’t believe it but it has been over 7 years since we purchased Benji, a male cinnamon capuchin, from an animal auction.  We’ve had him since he was 4 months old and while challenging at times, I truly enjoy spending time with him every single day whether it is “chase the monkey” or “cuddle time”.  Just like their human counterpart, monkeys are very social animals so spending lots of time with them is crucial to keep them happy and healthy.  Since humans can’t really replace the relationship they have with their own kind, we were looking for another cinnamon capuchin for quite some time because lets face it, they get bored so easily at the moments we’re not spending time with them.  When trying to find a companion, the biggest chance for success is by pairing them with the same kind, same sex so we were in essence looking for another male cinnamon capuchin between the ages of 4-7.  Given the fact that there aren’t that many cinnamon capuchins available in the USA, we knew we might have to be a bit flexible.

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Posted in capuchin, primate story, rehome

The Story of Cooper, a Rehomed Capuchin

July 26, 2016 8:00 pm

cooper rehome capuchin monkey

It was the summer of 2015 and after finally being settled into our new home, it was time to apply for an USDA license so I could exhibit Benji to others and get him a buddy. Monkeys are very social animals and don’t like being by themselves. I work full-time but am lucky enough to be able to work from home. Benji has access to my home office so he can visit me any time and he often spends hours in my office but having a buddy is still a lot better than just being able to see me during the day. We spend time every day together but that isn’t until after work or during my lunch break.

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Posted in capuchin, primate story, rehome

Opie’s Re-Homing Story

July 20, 2016 11:09 pm

By Mary Lynn Campbell

opie capuchin monkey rehome

When I look at this photo of our “Miss Opie,” my smile (inside and out) is for her unbelievable ability to surprise us at every turn as she did with this photo. Welcome once again to our monthly post here on the Primate Care site. This is the story of a re-homed girl monkey with a boy’s name, I must add that it took several days to finally get her permission to talk about her in this post. She is definitely a girl monkey who has a mind of her own!

When I went to pick up Opie from her previous owners, she let me know instantly that she was ready to be my monkey. Her eyes were full of acceptance and awe. She had a wonderful home with her owners but after experiencing life with her they felt she needed to be with other monkeys and wanted her to have an opportunity to bond with my troop.

She is smart and beautiful but there is a list of “nutty” things about her that is a mile long! Many of the things that have made up her list have been caused by a sketchy early background that we have been trying to piece together.

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Posted in capuchin, living with monkeys, monkey story

How to diaper a monkey

March 1, 2015 5:45 am

how to diaper a monkey

Amongst primate owners, the most commonly known method of diapering is the tail hole method but more and more primate owners are switching over to the tail wrap method. Since I’ve used both methods myself and don’t really have a particular preference, I reached out to other primate owners to find out why they prefer one method over the other. Before we go into more details, I’ve recorded a short video to demonstrate the difference between both methods. After that we’ll talk about diaper covers, different diaper brands, and what monkey parents are doing to prevent diaper rash.

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Posted in baboon, bush baby, capuchin, chimpanzee, gibbon, macaque, marmoset, owl monkeys, primate care, savanna monkey, squirrel monkeys, tamarin

The feeding of Primates

December 29, 2011 8:34 pm

By Ivan Crab

During recent years, the feeding of PRIMATES has undergone significant changes, as more has been discovered about their nutritional needs.   The pets market of today provide different “monkey pellets” , pelleted diets they are usually well balanced but they can not by given at the expense of a varied diet.

It is no coincidence that when breeding began in earnest during the 1950s, it was the OLD WORLD species which reproduced most successfully in collections. This is because MONKEYS such as the MACACA species were best-suited to thrive and breed on a diet composed of little more than vegetables and fruits.

The needs of other species are more complex. Certainly in captivity they thrive when offered a diet which contains a relatively high proportion of vegetables and fruit. more...

Posted in baboon, bush baby, capuchin, feeding, gibbon, lemur, macaque, marmoset, owl monkeys, squirrel monkeys, tamarin

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