Author Archive

How are we Monkey Families Coping?

May 22nd, 2020

By Mary Lynn Campbell

capuchin monkey hugs

Welcome to the Primate Care Site once again. This is such a great question for us families who are not only living during such trying times with our family members, but who are also living with monkeys. I hope some of the following thoughts might help many of you cope a little easier with the issues of stress.

If someone were to send us a multiple answer questionnaire about how we are coping with the levels of stress we are living under, I believe most of us would need to mark many of the questions with the answer of high or medium. One moment I am doing great living the stay at home lifestyle and then I will see an update of the number of virus cases that have increased in the last week or maybe I have opened up Facebook and in my scrolling I come across a headline that says, “Women Receives Flowers From A Florist Delivery Person And Gets The Covid-19 Virus.”

It is almost addicting at times the way we seem to read one story after another about what people are experiencing with this virus. It is one thing for us to stay current on things that are happening in our world but it is quite another thing when we begin to feel pulled into not being balanced with what we are reading about. On the other hand, I wonder what the real truth is anymore when I do start to listen or read anything lately. Since I have begun to feel this way I today am making a new rule that I am going to add to my already huge list of rules. I am choosing to start limiting the time I spend reading and listening to things about the virus.

» Read more: How are we Monkey Families Coping?

Housing a Single Monkey

May 15th, 2020

By Mary Lynn Campbell
lisa and opie capuchin
Lisa Covington With Her Monkey “Tiki”

This is a post that I have wanted to write about for a very long time. My pathway with living with monkeys has been different from many others. Therefore, I have actually very limited experience with living with only one of them. My first monkey was only with me for 6 short months prior to receiving my second one.

After receiving my first monkey named Penny, I started acquiring monkeys, one, two, three, four, five, etc. I suppose it was meant to become another part of my journey with having them. I can truly say that this was not at all what I planned to do, but they started coming. Now I certainly can see how important it was for me to learn from having several monkeys in my life and being able to share my life experiences. My mission definitely evolved into a deep need to understand these special creatures that God had sent into my life.

» Read more: Housing a Single Monkey

Your Monkeys and Corona Virus COVID-19

March 20th, 2020

By Mary Lynn Campbell

capuching at vets office
Willy, Myself and Dr. David Ratliff DVM

This is a post that I wanted to share from my wonderful retired vet, Dr. David Ratliff, DVM from Sevierville, Tennessee.

“My name is Dr.David Ratliff. I am a retired veterinarian who has cared for many monkeys in my career. Please use extreme caution with your monkeys while this virus is circulating. Honestly we do not know just how species specific the COVID-19 is at this point. However, the primate community would be the most likely place for the virus to jump from human back into animals. Out of an abundance of caution, it is recommended that those ill with COVID-19 limit contact with animals until more information is known about the virus. Have another member of your household take care of walking, feeding, and playing with your pet. If you have a service animal or you must care for your pet, then wear a facemask; don’t share food, kiss, or hug them; and wash your hands before and after any contact with them. Currently macaques, marmosets, and African green monkeys are being tested as research models along with the SARS mice model and ferrets. “

Thank you Dr Ratliff for continuing to care about our beloved monkeys.

» Read more: Your Monkeys and Corona Virus COVID-19

Gathering information about living with monkeys

July 27th, 2019

By Mary Lynn Campbell

capuchin toddler
Silly Willy (age 3)

Welcome once again to the primate care site.  The creator of this site and I are both very passionate about helping other monkey enthusiasts to gain good information on becoming great monkey caregivers.

Although we’re one of the oldest sites out there regarding primate care, we’re just one of the many available resources regarding the care for primates.  About thirty years ago, when I first became a monkey caregiver, there were no search engines or Facebook groups to gather intel, and most of the information was passed along by other monkey owners.  In today’s world, information is much more readily available.

Social media has literally changed my life. I realized from the very beginning of adding it into my busy life that there was a big world out there full of other monkey owners. After just a few months of being involved in reading and posting on Facebook, I began enjoying adding other monkey owners to my friends list. Some of them were new to owning a monkey, and then others were like myself trying to make connections with other monkey owners. Before I knew it, I had several hundred friends and I was added to many of the groups that offer help with diet, monkey enrichment ideas, and of course, information about the day to day living with monkeys.

» Read more: Gathering information about living with monkeys

Traveling with Monkeys

October 7th, 2018

By Mary Lynn Campbell

primate-travel-cages

Thank you for once again joining us here on the primate care site. This time we will be talking about travel cages that will be needed for monkeys as we travel away from our homes. During this post we will not only be talking about cages but we will also be talking about important things you need to know if you choose to travel across state lines with your monkeys.

» Read more: Traveling with Monkeys

Building a great monkey habitat

July 18th, 2018

By Mary Lynn Campbell

expensive monkeys
Leroy (18 years old) is a happy monkey in his special space.

Welcome once again to the Primate Care site. In my last post I spoke about toys and many of the safety issues surrounding using them for monkeys. I wanted to speak more about building a safe and happy place for your monkey but first I am writing about the importance of setting up an extra savings account for your monkey.

This special account will allow you to comfortably cover vet bills and other important needs that will arise for your baby monkey in the months and years that follow. We as monkey caregivers seem to experience many of the same things that parents of human children do. We begin to get all excited about our new monkey coming and begin to collect toys, diapers, diaper covers, clothes, monkey bottles and blankets, and of course, their travel cage and then their play cage.

Many of you who will be getting a monkey may already be part of a group of monkey caregivers, or have a friend that has a monkey or you may be choosing to get your information about caring for a monkey from this site.

» Read more: Building a great monkey habitat

Monkey Toys

February 25th, 2018

By Mary Lynn Campbell

monkey toys

Olivia – 5 Weeks Old

Happy New Year From Primate Care. We are excited to start 2018 with a post about monkey toys. All monkeys love toys from the very beginning of their lives. In my book “Living With Monkeys”, which is for sale on our sister site primatestore.com, I wrote about helping baby monkeys to not bite by offering things for them to chew on instead of your fingers, hands and hair. Yes, even your hair can become one of their favorite play things. Monkeys love to chew on everything.

When Bob and I were raising Silly Willy and he started to put his mouth on us, I knew it was time to offer him something to put his mouth on instead of us. Baby monkeys are not able to hold extremely large toys, so I went through the house and gathered things that I felt would fit into his small hands and then put small dishes full of these things into the rooms of the house that he was taken into.

The things that I chose to put into the dishes were things like: plastic Bic pen tops, medium size springs, medium size washers, large paper clips, medium key rings, plastic rings that are used to hang toys on baby cribs, plastic coke bottle caps, milk bottle caps, and any other small safe things that I could find. Of course, I washed these toys frequently to ensure that they were safe for my little guy.

I have also learned from many other monkey caregivers that some babies come with even more of a “mouthy problem” than Silly Willy came with and that their monkeys chose to put their mouth on everyone’s hands every time their baby monkey was being handle

. I know this must be a challenging behavior as a caregiver is trying to train their baby monkey to not do this. Due to this being such a problem, the little ones will become very hard to deal with when languaging with them using the word ‘NO’ so often.

» Read more: Monkey Toys

Are Monkeys Fragile in Captivity

November 21st, 2017

By Mary Lynn Campbell

monkeys in captivity
“Silly Willy” (age 14 weeks)

Welcome once again to this month’s post on the Primate Care Site. This “Special Topic” is an important subject for us to discuss due to the extreme number of monkeys who are loosing their lives every year to either a sickness or by a life taking accident. We will try to explore some of the reasons why this seems to be happening throughout the monkey owners community.

» Read more: Are Monkeys Fragile in Captivity

What about Leads and Neck Collars?

August 17th, 2017

By Mary Lynn Campbell

neck collar capuchin
“Leroy” (age 17) is “Sissy Lou La-La’s” new boyfriend

This topic is a very important one for all monkey caregivers to know about. Many of you may feel pulled by other people’s beliefs or opinions about what is the right way for you to tether your monkey for safety.

Networking on Facebook groups and other internet networks is absolutely wonderful for learning about how other monkey owners live with their monkeys but when it comes to a controversial subject like this, the lines can be drawn by judgments and opinions. It is my job to give you the facts about this subject so you can draw your own conclusions.

So, with your flexible mind I ask you to bear with me as I give you true facts and stories that will help you gain the information that you will need for making your own decisions about your monkey’s safety equipment. So, let’s begin our journey into this “Special Topic.”

» Read more: What about Leads and Neck Collars?

My Monkey Plate – A visual Aid for Feeding Your Primate

August 12th, 2017

By Janice Metzger

monkey_diet

Feeding a nonhuman primate can be complicated. How many biscuits should you feed? What kind of vegetables? Are they getting enough fiber? What IS fiber?! Am I feeding too much? Am I feeding enough? It’s no wonder that most of the questions we primate owners have about caring for our monkeys are related to diet.

Mazuri, a leading manufacturer of commercial primate diets, recommends that 50% of the primate diet be made up of biscuits and the other 50% made up of everything else that our monkey eats; such as vegetables, fruits, browse, nuts, proteins, etc. BUT, animal diets are always measured by weight, not by volume. To make this even more difficult, foods are measured on a dry weight basis. This means that you must calculate what the food weighs minus the moisture, or water content, in the food. There are numerous complicated formulas for doing this, but most of us in private ownership do not have access to this information. So, what do we do?

Fortunately for us, Mazuri recently published a shortcut on their website that can be calculated easily with a kitchen scale. Mazuri recommends a diet of 30% biscuits, 70% other foods by actual weight (not dry weight). This shortcut considers that vegetables, fruits, nuts, seeds, proteins and browse have a higher water content than dry biscuits. So, if we were to somehow squeeze all the water out of a diet of 30% biscuits/70% other foods, the result would be a diet that is approximately 50% biscuits and 50% other foods by dry weight, the industry standard.

Still confused? Are you pulling your hair out and screaming, “JUST SHOW ME HOW TO FEED MY MONKEY!”?

» Read more: My Monkey Plate – A visual Aid for Feeding Your Primate